Tag Archives: Sanitary Sewer Overflows

WEF Fact Sheet Describes Rainfall Derived Inflow and Infiltration Modeling

March 9, 2017

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The Water Environment Federation (WEF; Alexandria, Va.) Collection Systems Committee has released the fact sheet, “Sanitary Sewer Systems: Rainfall-Derived Inflow and Infiltration Modeling.” Rainfall-derived infiltration and inflow (RDII) is a known cause of sanitary sewer overflows. RDII simulation models help characterize system wet weather responses, evaluate needs, and predict performance within infiltration and inflow reduction […]

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WEF Committee Releases Infiltration and Inflow Fact Sheet

December 24, 2015

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In September, the Water Environment Federation (WEF; Alexandria, Va.) Collection Systems Committee released a fact sheet on reducing private property infiltration and inflow (PPII). Infiltration and inflow of stormwater and groundwater into sanitary sewers can overwhelm the sewers’ capacity and cause overflows. Sewer laterals, which connect buildings on private property to sewer mains, can be […]

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Take a Virtual Field Trip Through DC Water’s Stormwater Infrastructure

January 22, 2015

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Go online to get an up close and personal view of a giant tunnel and expansive green roof. These two components of DC Water’s (Washington, D.C.) Clean Rivers Project were the subject of a Nov. 19 virtual field trip. EarthEcho (Washington, D.C.) conducted “Virtual Field Trip: Managing Stormwater with DC Water.” Classrooms logged on and […]

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Stop, Don’t Flush That

June 12, 2013

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Robert Villée, Plainfield Area Regional Sewerage Authority (Middlesex, N.J.) executive director, worked with authority staff to test flushable-product claims using this system. Photo courtesy of Villée.

WEF members work to solve nondispersibles problem   Wastewater treatment systems operate 24-hours a day, 7-days a week — that is, until an item that doesn’t belong makes its way into the system, clogging pipes and causing headaches for operators. Defining nondispersibles Perpetrators mucking up the system are known as “nondispersibles,” which currently means anything […]

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